Category: VR

Unity Debug Diaries

Linear & Gamma Color Space in Unity & VR

Color space will come up sooner or later in your journey through game development. Unity has many great resources about this topic so it’s really futile for me to try and do it better. What I will do is give you the synopsis. Gamma is the old way and Linear is new. Use linear colorspace where ever you can. Its supported by most new GPUs and screens. On mobile, its supported on OpenGL ES 3+. The catch is, as of the time of this doc, mobile VR and especially, the GearVR. Turns out that there is a known issue, found on this Oculus thread, with the Qualcomm divers on Android. So Oculus, both in person and on forum encourage you to use Gamma for GearVR and Go.

That’s not all though. If you are like me and you are switching branches in GIT often, the Unity color space setting sometimes does not stick. This was especially evident in a recent project where we upgraded to 2017. In Unity 5, the color space setting had been changed a couple of times but what we were seeing as linear was not actually correct. When we did the upgrade, the color space was still strange until we toggled the setting. So if your color looks weird, toggle that setting first before you do a major overhaul.




LA Unity User Group

LA Unity User Group January 2015

To all of you great folks out there that didn’t made it to the Unity 5 catch up in Los Angeles last month, it was a good one. Carl Callewaert and Mark Schoennagel from Unity came down for a chat and the wonderful folks at Microsoft hosted us in their snazzy Playa del Ray offices. Once again, a huge thank you to Mark and Carl for taking the time and to Microsoft for being so incredibly supportive. Bug sout out to Grant Viklund, who organizes the LA Unity User Group every month with out ever a word of complaint! If you get the chance, join the LAUUG Meet-Up and donate a couple of bucks to show your appreciation.

Carl spoke about Unity 5 and showed of the latest build. He showed how easy it was to use Unity’s new PBR lighting system just by placing and manipulating light and reflection probes. He showed how easy it was to create day/night cycles by blending between environment maps and how well the lighting system reacted. For those of you that might not know, PBR stands for Physically Based Rendering and uses a unified lighting approach to rendering. A standard set of physical properties are applied to all objects in the scene and a highly optimized shader stack does all the work. It relies heavily on reflection maps because its based on the principal that every object is reflective, just in varying…